Eric  Johnson

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  • Title / Position: Head of Innovative Media
  • Organization: Innovative Media, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries
  • Twitter: ericdmj

Eric Johnson is the Head of Innovative Media at VCU Libraries, where he's helping to shape a state-of-the-art innovative media studio for the new library building on the Monroe Park Campus. He holds an MA in US History (George Mason University) and an MS in Library and Information Studies (Florida State). He also serves on the board of directors of the Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center in Charlottesville, VA.

  • Public humanities and the digital humanities

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    Hailing as I originally do from the museum and library world, I have a particular interest in the more outward-facing aspects of the humanities–and in the digital humanities, the aspects of the field that might particularly be considered “public” or “open.”  I’d love to get into a conversation about this stuff.  Maybe we can take a look at how audiences are examined in digital projects, or talk about the degree to which digital humanities projects are (or aren’t) by their very nature forms of public scholarship.  What makes a scholarly effort “public” in the first place, and is there anything particular to digital work that supports or undermines that idea?  Maybe we can talk about crowdsourcing and its role in digital research and scholarship.  In short, if the phrase “public humanities” catches your attention, I’d love to chat.

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  • Workshop: Do-It-Yourself Aerial Photography

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    And as promised, a description of the second workshop offered at THATCampVA on Friday, April 20. Indicate your interest when you register for THATCampVA.  From instructors Chris Gist and Kelly Johnston:

    Need aerial images for a scholarly publication or research project and can’t find any that fit your needs?  How about making your own?  Grassroots mapping is an idea that allows people to survey and map what is important to them.  People have surveyed oil spills, public demonstrations, small archaeological sites, etc.  at a scale that fits their needs by dangling cameras from balloons and kites.  They then use software to mosaic their aerial photographs into larger scenes that can be easily shared via Google Maps, Google Earth, or other digital mapping tools.

    Come learn techniques to fly your own camera, make your own mosaics and go fly a kite (or balloon in this case)!

    UPDATE: check out our post on the test flights!

     

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